1982 volume 14(9) pages 1251 – 1264
doi:10.1068/a141251

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Wermuth M J, 1982, "Hierarchical effects of personal, household, and residential location characteristics on individual activity demand" Environment and Planning A 14(9) 1251 – 1264

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Hierarchical effects of personal, household, and residential location characteristics on individual activity demand

M J Wermuth

Received 23 February 1982

Abstract. Frequency of activities categorized by work, work-related activity, education/training, personal shopping, recreation, and other personal business gives a characteristic measure for each individual, and it is therefore an important base variable for estimating demand in town and transport planning. In this context it is important to know whether the vector of category-specific activity frequencies is determined by personal, household, or residential location characteristics. These categories of characteristics display a hierarchical effects structure that is statistically analyzable only by means of a hierarchical analysis-of-variance model. The analysis of extensive data from household survey samples of 44 000 and 400 000 persons, respectively, in two different study areas shows that the obligatory activity levels (work, education/training) can be attributed most exclusively to person-specific characteristics, and that 70% of the variance for the private activities of individuals can be attributed to personal characteristics, between 15 - 30% to household characteristics, and only up to 4% to locational characteristics.

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